The ground absorbs nearly half of the solar energy our planet receives. As a result, the earth remains at a constant, moderate temperature just below its surface all year round. However, air temperature varies greatly from summer to winter, making air source (traditional) heating and cooling least efficient when you need it the most.

Geothermal heating and cooling systems take advantage of the stable temperature underground using a piping system, commonly referred to as a “loop.”   Water circulates in the loop to exchange heat between your home, the ground source heat pump, and the earth, providing geothermal heating, cooling, and hot water at remarkably high efficiencies.

Climatemaster Tranquility Series Heat Pump

• 29.6 EER/5.0 COP • 2-Stage Compressor • Optional vFlow® Internal Variable Water Flow Control • iGate® Communicating Controls • Variable Speed Indoor Fan
The ground absorbs nearly half of the solar energy our planet receives. As a result, the earth remains at a constant, moderate temperature just below its surface all year round. However, air temperature varies greatly from summer to winter, making air source (traditional) heating and cooling least efficient when you need it the most. Geothermal heating and cooling systems take advantage of the stable temperature underground using a piping system, commonly referred to as a “loop.” Water circulates in the loop to exchange heat between your home, the ground source heat pump, and the earth, providing geothermal heating, cooling, and hot water at remarkably high efficiencies. In fact, ClimateMaster geothermal heating and cooling systems are 400-600% efficient and can cut your heating, cooling, and hot water costs by up to 80%. But how does geothermal energy directly compare with more traditional methods of home heating and cooling? Let’s compare a high-efficiency gas furnace to a geothermal system for heating your home. A high-efficiency gas furnace will give you less than .96 units of heat for each unit of gas burned. In contrast, with the advantages of a geothermal system you get up to 5 units of heat for each unit of electricity used. How can that be? A furnace makes heat by burning fossil, a big disadvantage. A geothermal system doesn’t make its own heat; it simply collects heat from the earth and moves it to your home. The results can be a big difference in your monthly home heating bills. In terms of dollars on a yearly energy bill, take a look at the table below to see how the advantages of geothermal energy heating compares to heating with fossil fuels. But what about cooling your home? Let’s compare the advantages of a geothermal energy heating and cooling system to an air-source heat pump system for cooling. When it’s hot outside, an air-source heat pump takes heat from your home and moves to the outside air. As the outside air becomes warmer in summer, it becomes major disadvantage for the system to dump heat from your home into the already hot outside air. Because of this, when cooling a home with an air-source heat pump, the system becomes least efficient when it needs to be most efficient. A geothermal heat pump system doesn’t have this problem. A geothermal system exchanges the heat in your home with the cooler ground using it’s underground loop system. It simply doesn’t have to deal with high outside air temperatures the way that an air-source heat pump does. Add to that the fact that a geothermal system can be installed safely inside your home, with a loop buried underground. Unlike an air-source heat pump, there is no outdoor equipment exposed to the elements or the risk of vandalism.